All good things must come to an end

After five months in the Marquesas Islands our time here is coming to an end. We’re currently in Nuku Hiva organising a multitude of things so that we can go to sea tomorrow and head to the Tuamotus. We have exactly 26 days to explore some of the atolls before arriving in Tahiti for the 3rd of May for a much anticipated visit from Alex’s mum (Paulina we can’t wait to see you).

I’ve been pleasantly surprised by our return visit to Nuku Hiva. I was expecting to spend most of our time here doing jobs in preparation for our next voyage. As well as being super productive, we’ve also had plenty of time to enjoy ourselves. About a week after we got here, 45 boats from the ARC rally arrived as Nuku Hiva was their next rendezvous point. Although it made for a crowded anchorage, it was nice to make some new friends and the locals were prepared with fully stocked shops, markets and craft fairs. We also had time to re-visit the waterfall that Alex missed out on last time when he was trying to keep out of the sun to protect his new tattoo. We seemed to switch roles for a moment and Alex also found time to take a hike while I stayed on board to do some boat work.

We had a lovely surprise when we heard that the Hokule’a was arriving to the island and the locals were holding a ceremony to commemorate the occasion. The Hokule’a is a traditional Polynesian pirogue (in this case, two canoes joined together with a crab claw sailing rig) with no engine – the only means of propulsion is through either sailing or rowing. The vessel is based in Hawaii and was designed to test a theory regarding historic navigation techniques. The traditional wayfinding techniques were learned from elders in Micronesia. These techniques use the position of the stars and sea-swell analysis (amongst other things) to determine position and course. No instruments are needed whatsoever – no electronic equipment, no GPS, no sextant, not even a compass. A crew sailed the Hokule’a using these ancient methods on various voyages around the Pacific since being launched in the 1970s, thus proving the theory of how ancient Polynesians migrated through the islands and their ancestral descent, which has since been confirmed by genetic analysis. More recently, in 2014 the vessel set sail from Hawaii for a circumnavigation which is now coming to an end. Their stop in Marquesas is only two stops before their final destination in Hawaii after successfully sailing around the world. The arrival of the crew on shore was really spectacular. Many of the locals were dressed in traditional attire and were singing, blowing horns, dancing and beckoning the new arrivals to land. The crew were brought to shore in smaller pirogues and greeted by a parade through the street then a ceremony performed in front of the entire village. It was a wonderful sight. For the crew (who had just arrived from a long journey from Pitcairn Island over 1000 miles away) it must have been truly magnificent, if not a little overwhelming.

The Hokule’a anchored in the main harbour in Nuku Hiva. It’s a spectacular boat, it looks stunning and is a true testament to Polynesian heritage. Although, does anyone know what that weird British flag is? Neither Alex or I have ever seen it before.
If you’re interested, you can read more about the Hokule’a here: http://www.hokulea.com/voyages/our-story/

The crew being greeted by the village chief in Taiohae. This and the next few photos are from Marc from s/v Scallywag (thanks Marc!)

During the ceremony. Many local Marquisians dressed in traditional attire, proudly displaying their expressive tattoos.

Many Westerners would cross the street to avoid someone who looks like this. Here, facial and body tattoos are not just accepted but are embraced. In fact, this gentleman is called Farah and was involved in the organisation of the music festival we attended here last November. He’s a really nice guy and even got involved in our silly coconut game that we mentioned in a previous blog.

Another high point was swimming with manta rays on three separate occasions. The last time was absolutely amazing! We swam with about 10 reef mantas for about half an hour as they were feeding. They were very happy to play nearby and often swam within about 30cm of us – they were bigger than Alex. It was one of the most awesome wildlife experiences I’ve ever had and I’d really recommend it if you ever get the chance.

Manta ray photo taken with the GoPro

I also managed to fit in one final dance session with my local friends and introduced a few new cruising ladies to the joys of the Polynesian dance classes. Hopefully they will continue to go after I’ve left.

All good things must come to an end and although I’ve really enjoyed my time here, I must admit I’m okay at the thought of leaving. It’s the first time that I’ve not gotten sentimental about leaving an area. I suppose we have been here for 5 months now and there are so many exciting places ahead of us this year, I’m ready to leave.

12 Responses to All good things must come to an end

  1. Lovely hearing of your adventures hope you are both keeping well and enjoying yourselves because it must be hard work but worth it .Just wondered when you will have finished your voyage so then I might see my new neighbours who I never got to know take care of yourselves.xxxx

    • Hi guys, lovely to hear from you. Our current plan is to finish in few years time but our plan is flexible and depends on what opportunities arise. How are the current neighbours? 🙂

  2. Hi Alex and Sarah, I am enjoying your adventures very much. The photos add so much to
    appreciating your visual experiences. Certainly things we only see via National Geographic.
    The Hokule’a is truly an amazing vessel. The flag with the ‘jack’ on it is I believe Hawaii .
    Your blog is fascinating more so of course as I owned a sister ship to Bob. You are on a good ship.
    Enjoy your sail to Tahiti.
    Fair winds,
    Jim Amos

  3. Hi! You are doing what a tiny fraction of world travellers ever get to do…and I thought my visits to the Arctic/East Greenland and Antarctica were remote! Fascinating descriptions and photos! Please keep them coming. Happy celebrations tomorrow, to Alex! Love, Vicky

    • Thanks for your comments Vicky, they’re always so positive. I’m very glad you’re enjoying the blog. Lots of love xx

  4. Nice pictures, safe journey, happy birthday to Alex. Looking forward to hearing from you at your next port of call. xx.

  5. Happy birthday Alex. What a place to celebrate! Have a wonderful birthday. The blogs are amazing and the photos incredible. Lots of love to you too, Sarah. Miss you both, but looking forward to seeing you in Thailand xxxx

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